Why Do Streaming TV Shows Like Hulu’s ‘The Path’ Take a Whole Season to Pay off?

The television industry is currently in the middle of a radical paradigm shift, as streaming networks like Amazon, Netflix, and Hulu look to create as much original content as possible. One of the most notable changes evident in the flood of new content is the total abandonment of the long-accepted idea that a show needs to hook a viewer in its first act, or at least its first episode.

But streaming shows like The Path, Bloodline, Hand of God, Love, Sense8, and many others are taking this to extremes, seeming barely concerned with letting stories pay off until viewers have sat through a whole season.

Source: The Atlantic

Why Spotify Needs To Invest In Visual Along With Audio

spotify-dataIf Spotify wants to win the streaming battle, it needs to double down on video and invest in sharing and creating great content.

‘There are three different paths the company could take. The easiest and most obvious would be to build a library of great music video content — every time a user wanted to hear a song, they would be served the official video along with the audio.Spotify could also license concert videos and even venture into live streaming shows.

It’s not a new strategy — Tidal attempted to live-stream Kanye West’s album release party, although it was plagued by technical difficulties, but at least it is on brand and would add some value to the user experience.A more interesting move would be to launch a suite of original programming, although Apple Music and Tidal are also in this space.

Source: MP

World on A String: Swinging Songs of Broadway – Live Webcast

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis and vocalist Kate Davis pay tribute to Broadway’s brightest lights.

The famed avenue has been home to some of the most talented, inventive, and sophisticated composers, many with jazz-oriented roots. Harold Arlen wrote over 500 songs, including many for the stage as well as the classic “Over the Rainbow,” which was voted the No. 1 song by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Jerome Kern and Irving Berlin are two of the most significant American theatrical composers of the early 20th century, each having been represented on Broadway hundreds of times. The list goes on: composers like Cole Porter, Stephen Sondheim, and Mel Brooks have penned time-tested musical gems that continue to uplift and entertain – both on Broadway and on record. In tonight’s performance, gutsy songstress Kate Davis shares her own fresh spin on the standards, which are sure to put you in a New York state of mind.

Source: WMO

Wynton Marsalis Swings and Streams Online

platform-and-stream-wynton

Catching Wynton Marsalis with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra is always a special treat. Or perhaps watching the acclaimed musician perform with his legendary septet in a small club is the preferred option for an evening of jazz music.

Marsalis is seemingly always on tour, bringing the swing and the soul to cities big and small around the world.

As video streaming, along with live streaming, continues to gain popularity, the globe-trotting, multi-award-winning trumpeter and composer has been ahead of the curve of streaming media, utilizing the power of the Internet and the technology of live video platform Livestream to reach a world-wide audience.

Be it performing at an intimate club like Ronnie Scott’s, or swinging ’til the midnight hour inside the beautiful Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center, Marsalis has embraced the creative opportunities of streaming video and by doing so presented jazz fans quite a wonderful gift: the gift of access, to ‘be there’ when you really cannot ‘be there’ to enjoy the music and moment as it happens.

Powered by Livestream, there have been numerous Wynton Marsalis events that have featured mobile and connected TV applications with real-time DVR, chat, photos and other materials available to fans worldwide.

These concerts, available on the official Wynton Marsalis website, as well as a dedicated Livestream page, stream live in high-definition audio and video for free to a global audience.

“Free to a global audience…” Hard to find anything wrong in that description of what Marsalis and his jazz and tech cohorts are presenting to music fans everywhere.

The mission of Jazz at Lincoln Center is to “entertain, enrich and expand a global community for Jazz through performance, education and advocacy.”

And what better way to promote this enthusiasm and ambition than with the power of technology, or more specifically the streaming technology that allows all this talent, all this optimism, and all this joy to be appreciated and enjoyed all around the world.

I couldn’t be in France last year for the Jazz in Marciac Festival (I know, hard to believe), but I was still able to watch the Wynton Marsalis Septet perform – thanks to Livestream’s live webcast, which looked and sounded superb.

As wonderful as actually being there? No. But not too shabby an evening of entertainment considering the comfy couch, the laptop and, of course, the music.

This is live streaming done right, the technology and the content blended like fine whiskey. Nothing to do but click and enjoy. Kudos to the Livestream team, who clearly buzzed their A Team into action for live video broadcasting projects with Wynton Marsalis.

The quality is sensational.

It was a wonderful evening of jazz – for those in southwestern France for the international jazz festival, as well as jazz lovers everywhere with a great opportunity to stream the night away with the Wynton Marsalis Septet.